Health

Eating Too Much Sugar Doesn’t Always Result in Type 2 Diabetes

type 2 diabetes sugar
Image- Bru-nO (pixabay.com)

Most people believe that eating too much sugar is the only reason behind type 2 diabetes. However, this is not true and misleading because diabetes is much more than just sugar intake.

Every one in ten people is a victim of type 2 diabetes and this number is increasing every year. The risk of diabetes is extremely higher in older people and the health experts warn that nearly half the population in the U.S. is diabetic or in a prediabetics phase. Not to forget, 90% to 95% of cases of diabetes report type 2 diabetes and type 2 diabetes and gestational are relatively less prevalent.

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One thing which is common in all types of diabetes is that they experience a sugar spike in their blood. It is remarkably higher which is why people believe that eating sugar food causes diabetes. For type 1 diabetes, it can’t be true because this type of diabetes is an autoimmune disease. However, it is more associated with other factors such as dietary habits and exercise.

For type 2 diabetes, this situation is different. An unhealthy dietary pattern along with an underlying genetic condition and a sedentary lifestyle all trigger its risk. The body changes its sugar metabolization capacity with age and for older patients, the risk of diabetes type 2 is the highest.

To understand the link between sugar and diabetes, it is necessary to know what causes high sugar in the blood. The biggest risk factor in sugar spike is the carbohydrates intake. These carbohydrates are present in almost all food items. From sweets to sodas and bread, carbs are everywhere.

Digesting these carbohydrates yields glucose which is directly released in the bloodline. These glucose molecules are responsible for energy production in the body. So, for the body to work properly, it needs glucose. But at the same time, this glucose production should be in limit, otherwise, high glucose levels could affect the health.

Despite people normalizing diabetes as ‘a common thing’ it has adverse effects on the body. uncontrolled blood sugar can result in cardiovascular diseases, kidney failure, and other chronic problems. That’s the reason the human body has to maintain healthy levels of sugar inside the blood.

Dr. Diana Licalzi is a certified dietitian and nutritionist who emphasizes on a healthy diet to control high sugar. She says that anything that you eat is eventually broken down into glucose and the insulin secreted from the pancreas ensures the cellular uptake of this sugar. the remaining sugar is stored in the body to be used later.

But in the patients of type 2 diabetes, the natural capacity of the body to breakdown and metabolize sugar is affected. Instead of delivering it to the cells, the body accumulates it in the blood, causing a sugar spike. This condition is called insulin resistance which is common in diabetic patients.

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Taking an excessive amount of sugar is not the only cause of type 2 diabetes. Other factors such as being overweight, genetics, and lifestyle changes also have a huge impact on it.

A study published in the journal International Journal of Preventative Medicine reveals that a person’s waist measurement is also a good standard to predict the risk of diabetes, in addition to BMI alone.

So people who are at risk of diabetes or are already diagnosed with diabetes type 2 should work on their weight and reduce it to be fit and healthy. The best is to follow a natural weight loss, under the supervision of certified nutrition or dietician. Never go for the ‘popular’ and ‘trendy’ diet plans as they may bring undesirable effects making the condition worse.

 

About the author

Areeba Hussain

Graduated in Medical Microbiology, Areeba is working as a full-time medical writer for the last few years. She enjoys summarizing the latest researches into readable news to convey the recent advancements in medicine and human health.

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